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IFIC Australia Update

6
Apr

The core mission of IFIC Australia is to develop capacity and capabilities in Australia and the Asia Pacific Region in the design and delivery of integrated care. IFIC Australia seeks to achieve this by providing a platform to develop and exchange ideas and promote activities in the region in keeping with IFIC’s mission. Get up to date on all IFIC Australia’s recent activates below.

Catch up on Case Management Webinar with Sue Lukersmith

IFIC Australia’s most recent webinar took place on Friday, 27 March with Dr Sue Lukersmith, Senior Research Fellow, Australian National University and Associate University of Sydney. Case management in various forms is often used, although poorly understood. This webinar explains case management as a care coordination strategy for individuals. Quality analysis and macro to micro practice issues are explored through examples. You can download Sue’s presentation here or watch the webinar here.

Integrated Care brings Value to People and Communities at APIC2 in Melbourne

450 delegates joined us in Melbourne for the 2nd Asia Pacific Conference on Integrated Care. At the conference we took the opportunity to present Professor Nick Goodwin with a gift recognising his role as Founder and CEO of the Foundation from 2011 to 2019. In August 2019, Nick was appointed as Professor and Director of the Central Coast Research Institute, a joint initiative between the University of Newcastle and the Central Coast Local Health District. The presentation was made by Dr Toni Dedeu from the Foundation and Professor David Perkins from University of Newcastle and Director of IFIC Australia. Nick continues to be involved with the Foundation as the  Chair of IFIC Australia.

The presentations and videos from the conference can now be accessed via the conference webpage.

Blog: A ship without a compass? 

Following up from his presentation at APIC2, in his most recent blog Professor Nick Goodwin, Director of the Central Coast Research Institute and Chair of IFIC Australia sets out the case for a more intimate relationship between research, policy and practice to enable the mores successful adoption of integrated Care.

In his seminal article on the Five Laws of Integrated Care published in 1999, Walter Leutz included two key statements that continue to be true yet are largely overlooked. The two laws in question are: “All integrated care is local” and “You cannot fit a square peg into a round hole”.

The first law speaks to a truth that the real impact of integrated care happens at the interface between care professionals, patients and carers, and the communities in which they belong. The ability to provide relational continuity to individuals; to coordinate care and services flexibly around people’s needs; and the insight to bring together all the assets across a community that help to improve health and wellbeing – this is where the transformational effect of integrated care happens. Yet, in our design of integrated care programmes – and in the subsequent evaluations we put in place – we focus on the efficacy of programme interventions or structural reforms and so usually fail to dig deep enough to understand ‘how’ integrated care happens and why. [Read more]

Paper on search filter development featured in BMC Medical Research Methodology

Integrated Care Search (ICS) is a validated search filter giving ‘one-click’ access to the integrated care research literature in the PubMed database. It was launched at the 18th International Conference on Integrated Care ICIC18 held in Utrecht in May 2018. ICS is freely accessible on the IFIC website.

ICS was a joint project between IFIC, Central Coast Local Health District (NSW, Australia), Flinders Filters (Flinders University, South Australia), and The University of Newcastle (NSW, Australia). The filter’s creators have published a paper in BMC Medical Research Methodology on the process of creating the search filter entitled “Integrated Care Search: development and validation of a PubMed search filter for retrieving the integrated care research evidence“. The paper describes the process used to ensure methodological rigour while at the same time achieving a product that was of real-world use in a range of contexts. In fact, two versions of the search filter were developed: one optimised for recall, attractive to researchers undertaking comprehensive reviews of the literature; and the other optimised for precision, useful to anyone seeking fast, efficient access to integrated care research.

An earlier paper, entitled “Finding the Integrated Care evidence base in PubMed and beyond: a bibliometric study of the challenges”, was published in the International Journal of Integrated Care in August 2018. This paper described the bibliometric characteristics of published research on integrated care, particularly its diffuse nature and the difficulties of accurate retrieval via either subject headings or keywords.

The ICS project team hopes to undertake some evaluation of the search filter in 2020. They are interested in knowing who is using it, how it is being used, and how it could be improved. If you have used the search filter and have feedback for the team, please get in touch by emailing Suzanne Lewis (Suzanne.lewis@health.nsw.gov.au).

Blog:The Orange Declaration

Perhaps it was the 2018 Senate Inquiry into Rural and Remote Mental Health, or the earlier Obsessive Hope Disorder Report, or one of many conference programs which fueled a growing feeling that rural mental health services were not leading to better health and that doing more of the same was unlikely to make much difference. Speaking to my research colleagues I discovered that I was not alone and completing a position paper on rural suicide reinforced the feeling that some fresh thinking was needed.

Orange in October is full of reminders of Spring, buds everywhere, longer days, new wines to be tasted and good restaurants to visit. Why not invite a dozen interested parties from the rural mental health fraternity to take out 24 hours, enjoy a meal, develop a working partnership and rethink rural mental health: pay their own way and I would provide lunch. There were sufficient takers to start a movement and so the Orange Declaration on Rural and Remote Mental health was born. [Read more]

Congratulations to Sydney Local Health District

From left: Lou-Anne Blunden, Erin Miller, John Eastwood, Paula Caffrey, Miranda Shaw

Congratulations to Sydney Local Health District (SLHD) for taking out the Collaboration Award in the 2019 Prime Minister’s Awards for Excellence in Public Sector Management. The ‘Creating Healthy Homes and Neighbourhoods’ initiative delivers cross-agency care coordination to ensure vulnerable families have their health and social needs met, and are connected to society. The winners were announced at an Award Ceremony at Parliament House in Canberra on 13 November 2019. The award was proudly accepted by representatives from SLHD on behalf of the many multiagency team members that contribute to the delivery of this initiative on a daily basis.

Find out more about the ‘Creating Healthy Homes and Neighbourhoods’ initiative here!

How to master the aged care maze

Congratulations to Sydney Local Health District (SLHD) for taking out the Collaboration Award in the 2019 Prime Minister’s Awards for Excellence in Public Sector Management. The ‘Creating Healthy Homes and Neighbourhoods’ initiative delivers cross-agency care coordination to ensure vulnerable families have their health and social needs met, and are connected to society. The winners were announced at an Award Ceremony at Parliament House in Canberra on 13 November 2019. The award was proudly accepted by representatives from SLHD on behalf of the many multiagency team members that contribute to the delivery of this initiative on a daily basis.

Find out more about the ‘Creating Healthy Homes and Neighbourhoods’ initiative here!

Australian papers recently published in the International Journal of Integrated Care (IJIC)

Formative Evaluation of the Central Coast Integrated Care Program (CCICP), NSW Australia
Integrated care has been posited as an important strategy for overcoming service fragmentation problems and achieving the Quadruple Aim of health care. This paper describes the Central Coast Integrative Care Program (CCICP) a complex, multi-component intervention addressing 3 target populations and more than 40 sub-projects of different scale, priority and maturity. Details are provided of the implementation including activities undertaken for each target population, in the context of the Central Coast Local Health District (CCLHD) strategies and priorities. Key lessons are drawn from the formative evaluation.
https://www.ijic.org/articles/10.5334/ijic.4633/

Integrating Healthcare Services for Indigenous Australian Students at Boarding Schools: A Mixed-Methods Sequential Explanatory Study
Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian adolescents from remote communities attend boarding schools, requiring integrated healthcare between home and schools. This study explored students’ health status, healthcare service use and satisfaction.
https://www.ijic.org/articles/10.5334/ijic.4669/